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  • user 2:53 am on June 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , fintech, , , , , , ,   

    The Clearing House Sponsored A Contest For Apps Using Its Real-Time Payment Rails 

    The North Carolina Hub and The invited and fintech firms to develop innovative solutions the TCH real-time payments (RTP) network.
    Financial Technology

     
  • user 11:54 pm on January 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: fintech, , , , , ,   

    Fintech Regulators — Look South Where Mexico Shows How To Do It 

    is the second country, after the UK FCA, to introduce regulation to support firms, including sandboxes which state in the U.S. deride.
    Financial Technology

     
  • user 9:53 pm on January 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , fintech, , , , , , , ,   

    Partnership Fund For New York City Has Successful Grads From Its FinTech Innovation Lab 

    The for New and Accenture have been running a Lab that brings together skilled startups with and now insurance companies.
    Financial Technology

     
  • user 2:52 pm on December 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , fintech, , , , , ,   

    European Open Banking Grows Through Smart Regulation 

    Data privacy regs in Europe provide standards for and to share data, with a customer’s consent, so they can offer tailored solutions.
    Financial Technology

     
  • user 12:50 pm on November 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , fintech,   

    How Fintech Has Improved the Foreign Exchange Market 

    From the use of artificial intelligence to bank apps to chatbots, has become a behemoth force to reckon with in today’s world.

    Fintech was coined from “Financial ”. It simply refers to the use of technology across all functions and facets of financial services.

    It is impossible to disregard Fintech as a solid aspect of change in the world today.

    All trends also indicate that it could only get better.

    Particularly, the foreign sector is enjoying this advancement in technology. Those conversant with the foreign exchange sector can attest to the revolution and scalability associated with fintech.

    It is pertinent to note that foreign exchange is not Forex. Forex refers to a decentralized global market where the currencies in the world are traded with leverage. Forex is also referred to as currency trading.

    Foreign exchange on the other hand, is the conversion of different currencies. Here, no leverage is involved. This does not mean foreign exchange cannot generate profit as a business.  With a good understanding of the pros and cons of the financial market, it is highly lucrative as well.

    How Fintech Has Made the Foreign Exchange Market Better and Stronger:

     

    • A Drastic Reduction in The Cost of Foreign Exchange Fees

    A major challenge for many that deal with foreign exchange frequently is costs required in executing transactions. Such transactions include transfers and remittances. Fintech has worked in this space to cut down the costs associated with foreign exchange. This advantage is not only beneficial to only customers, but to the as well. Fees have drastically reduced and networks now easily render services that were out of their capacity in previous years.  The access of customers to smartphones is also a major plus for the fintech industry, as processes could be carried out in a matter of seconds.

    As a result of the drastic reduction in dealing with foreign exchange, several people are drawn to this market. Hence, there is an overall boom and the market gets more stable with every new fintech development.

    For cross-border remittances, minimization and elimination of fees is now possible. This is all possible; thanks to fintech.

    Fintech has helped in getting closer towards achieving the United Nation SDG of a global 3% transaction cost.

     

    • Reduction of the Incidences of Fraud in dealing with foreign exchange

    All of over the world, financial institution experience all kinds of fraud attacks. In the foreign exchange sector especially, fraud is still a thorn in the flesh. In today’s fintech powered world, devices can be tracked and traced after certain transactions with foreign exchange.

    Biometrics like vocal patterns, facial recognition, thumbprints and irises are now used for authentication. These kinds of verifications can also be performed on the user’s smartphone. Online payment apps are taking advantage of fintech in this respect.

     

    Trust is necessary for dealing in the foreign exchange market. The blockchain which is highly trusted, has entered the fintech space. In Blockchain, no historical data can be altered without a generalized agreement from all participants of the network. A system administrator or a user in a single entity can’t make changes to the data on a blockchain without having an agreement from every participant. This provides a perfect platform trading and reduction in criminal activities, as nothing is done in the hidden.

     

     

    • Artificial Intelligence

    Gradually, problems of money laundering are going into extinction. The anti-money laundering departments of many banks now use artificial intelligence. Machine learning is also helpful. This is because fintech has helped in combating laundering as well as other frauds. The availability of data in the technological space makes it easier. Although, there are several hindrances, the process is steadily at work. Fintech’s relevance in foreign exchange continues to evolve. Fintech is moving to the point of being at the very center of foreign exchange. Reaching that milestone will indicate real progress.

     

    Conclusively:

    Indeed, with fintech, the world’s finance has taken its place within the sphere of this “global village”. It is more important that the world at large embraces and understands the advancement in fintech.

     

    Demi Oye is Freelance Writer in Fintech

     
  • user 2:53 am on October 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , fintech, OnRamp, , , Sila,   

    Sila Provides FinTech Companies With An On-Ramp To Payments 

    is designed to help fintechs get access to networks without going through months of regulatory approvals for money transfer licenses.
    Financial Technology

     
  • user 3:36 pm on October 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , fintech, , , ,   

    The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Malaysia 

    Following the rollout of regulations in the UK and the launch this year of the EU’s Payment Services Directive 2 (PSD2), countries across the Asia-Pacific region are following suit to establish their own frameworks to enable to share select customer data with third-party providers (TPPs), and TPPs to run transactions on customer accounts.

    Click/tap to view larger

    Regulatory Developments

    As in Singapore, ’s approach to Open Banking, while less comprehensive than that of its city-state neighbour, has been to establish a non-mandatory framework and to support banking transformation with the creation of implementation teams. There are currently no timelines for implementation.

    Malaysia’s central bank and principal financial services regulator, Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM), established a Financial Technology Enabler Group (FTEG) in June 2016 to support innovations in the sector. The FTEG is responsible for formulating and enhancing regulatory policies related to the adoption of new in financial services in the country. Accordingly, in mid-2017 it launched a Regulatory Sandbox framework to allow the testing of applicable technology, including Open Banking.

    In its final quarterly bulletin of 2017 [PDF], BNM focused on open APIs and their potential impact on the country’s financial sector, promising to establish an Open API Implementation Group in early 2018. This was set up in March, with a remit to develop standards on open data, security, access rights and oversight arrangements for TPPs, and to review existing regulations covering controls on customer information.

    Also in March, the BNM set up an Interoperable Credit Transfer Framework (ICTF), which promotes collaborative competition for mobile payments.

    Key market initiatives, opportunities & risks

    The government is prioritising the impact of new technology on the banking sector, with insurers and government agencies a secondary focus. Banks have already seen the opportunities and risks, with some acting to anticipate and benefit from the impact of the country’s vibrant fintech scene, although in the main they lack the capabilities to launch and scale open APIs.

    CIMB, for instance, launched its fintech incubation programme as early as 2015, targeting and mentoring startups for their API platforms. The bank subsequently released a point-of-sale and payments platform. Standard Chartered in early 2017 launched a global developer sandbox with limited API capabilities. Later that year, Maybank also launched a developer portal equipped with 20 APIs, enabling 85 differing operations. Hong Leong Bank, meanwhile, runs a “LaunchPad” contest to develop innovations, which led to the successful launch of five applications in its first year.

    Another significant development that banks in Malaysia seized on was BNM’s granting in December 2017 of an e-money license to WeChat Pay, the payments platform run by Chinese tech giant Tencent. Hong Leong Bank, Maybank, Public Bank and CIMB subsequently partnered with WeChat Pay.

    Partnering with fintech innovators is one way banks in Malaysia are monetising Open Banking APIs; bank-specific POS systems have also been sold with payment-API connectivity. Predetermined pricing models—subscriptions, per-call and flat rate charges—have also been used. So far, successful open API use cases such as Maybank’s Treats Card app, on the Maybank2u platform, have been focused on retail customers.

    Click/tap to view larger

    Several global, regional and Malaysian banks have granted developers access to their APIs via publicly available developer portals and sandboxes. Maybank, OCBC and DBS have advertised various applications and partnerships that have arisen from the use of their developer platforms. Some other banks, such as CIMB and Hong Leong, have been more selective, privately choosing which fintechs can access their APIs.

    The use of developer portals and individual selection means that Malaysia has a number of siloed Open Banking use cases and products. The country’s Open Banking future will depend on how banks, fintechs and regulators develop a common framework and infrastructure that supports a cohesive ecosystem. The ASEAN Financial Innovation Network (AFIN), has been established to do exactly that.

    AFIN, which is supported by the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) and the International Finance Corporation, aims to accelerate fintech innovation, digital transformation and build an Open Banking ecosystem across the region. This gives Malaysian fintechs and banks the opportunity to develop the infrastructure and capabilities with other geographies to support a regional Open Banking ecosystem.

    Like Singapore, there are risks in Malaysia’s approach: without enforced compliance, the standardisation and adoption of APIs across the country could prove difficult. There is also uncertainty around when the Malaysian authorities will impose regulation.

    In Malaysia as well, further opportunities will present themselves to drive retail and SME customer adoption with additional services and reduce the cost of servicing banks’ customer bases. Ecosystem platforms for real-time data sharing between banks and regulators will enable new use cases and shared revenue models—and, ultimately, enable banks to build their own TPP services using their competitors’ APIs.

    This article was written in collaboration with Ewa Wojcik, Sam Waldman and Hakan Eroglu. Many thanks for their input, research and analysis.

     

    Accenture at Sibos

    We’ll be discussing Open Banking and other topics at Sibos. Come see us at our booth and join us in the conversation around enabling the digital economy. Keep up to date on all the latest from us around Sibos right here on the blog.

     

    The post The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Malaysia appeared first on Accenture Banking Blog.

    Accenture Banking Blog

     
  • user 3:36 pm on October 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , fintech, , , ,   

    The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Malaysia 

    Following the rollout of regulations in the UK and the launch this year of the EU’s Payment Services Directive 2 (PSD2), countries across the Asia-Pacific region are following suit to establish their own frameworks to enable to share select customer data with third-party providers (TPPs), and TPPs to run transactions on customer accounts.

    Click/tap to view larger

    Regulatory Developments

    As in Singapore, ’s approach to Open Banking, while less comprehensive than that of its city-state neighbour, has been to establish a non-mandatory framework and to support banking transformation with the creation of implementation teams. There are currently no timelines for implementation.

    Malaysia’s central bank and principal financial services regulator, Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM), established a Financial Technology Enabler Group (FTEG) in June 2016 to support innovations in the sector. The FTEG is responsible for formulating and enhancing regulatory policies related to the adoption of new in financial services in the country. Accordingly, in mid-2017 it launched a Regulatory Sandbox framework to allow the testing of applicable technology, including Open Banking.

    In its final quarterly bulletin of 2017 [PDF], BNM focused on open APIs and their potential impact on the country’s financial sector, promising to establish an Open API Implementation Group in early 2018. This was set up in March, with a remit to develop standards on open data, security, access rights and oversight arrangements for TPPs, and to review existing regulations covering controls on customer information.

    Also in March, the BNM set up an Interoperable Credit Transfer Framework (ICTF), which promotes collaborative competition for mobile payments.

    Key market initiatives, opportunities & risks

    The government is prioritising the impact of new technology on the banking sector, with insurers and government agencies a secondary focus. Banks have already seen the opportunities and risks, with some acting to anticipate and benefit from the impact of the country’s vibrant fintech scene, although in the main they lack the capabilities to launch and scale open APIs.

    CIMB, for instance, launched its fintech incubation programme as early as 2015, targeting and mentoring startups for their API platforms. The bank subsequently released a point-of-sale and payments platform. Standard Chartered in early 2017 launched a global developer sandbox with limited API capabilities. Later that year, Maybank also launched a developer portal equipped with 20 APIs, enabling 85 differing operations. Hong Leong Bank, meanwhile, runs a “LaunchPad” contest to develop innovations, which led to the successful launch of five applications in its first year.

    Another significant development that banks in Malaysia seized on was BNM’s granting in December 2017 of an e-money license to WeChat Pay, the payments platform run by Chinese tech giant Tencent. Hong Leong Bank, Maybank, Public Bank and CIMB subsequently partnered with WeChat Pay.

    Partnering with fintech innovators is one way banks in Malaysia are monetising Open Banking APIs; bank-specific POS systems have also been sold with payment-API connectivity. Predetermined pricing models—subscriptions, per-call and flat rate charges—have also been used. So far, successful open API use cases such as Maybank’s Treats Card app, on the Maybank2u platform, have been focused on retail customers.

    Click/tap to view larger

    Several global, regional and Malaysian banks have granted developers access to their APIs via publicly available developer portals and sandboxes. Maybank, OCBC and DBS have advertised various applications and partnerships that have arisen from the use of their developer platforms. Some other banks, such as CIMB and Hong Leong, have been more selective, privately choosing which fintechs can access their APIs.

    The use of developer portals and individual selection means that Malaysia has a number of siloed Open Banking use cases and products. The country’s Open Banking future will depend on how banks, fintechs and regulators develop a common framework and infrastructure that supports a cohesive ecosystem. The ASEAN Financial Innovation Network (AFIN), has been established to do exactly that.

    AFIN, which is supported by the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) and the International Finance Corporation, aims to accelerate fintech innovation, digital transformation and build an Open Banking ecosystem across the region. This gives Malaysian fintechs and banks the opportunity to develop the infrastructure and capabilities with other geographies to support a regional Open Banking ecosystem.

    Like Singapore, there are risks in Malaysia’s approach: without enforced compliance, the standardisation and adoption of APIs across the country could prove difficult. There is also uncertainty around when the Malaysian authorities will impose regulation.

    In Malaysia as well, further opportunities will present themselves to drive retail and SME customer adoption with additional services and reduce the cost of servicing banks’ customer bases. Ecosystem platforms for real-time data sharing between banks and regulators will enable new use cases and shared revenue models—and, ultimately, enable banks to build their own TPP services using their competitors’ APIs.

    This article was written in collaboration with Ewa Wojcik, Sam Waldman and Hakan Eroglu. Many thanks for their input, research and analysis.

     

    Accenture at Sibos

    We’ll be discussing Open Banking and other topics at Sibos. Come see us at our booth and join us in the conversation around enabling the digital economy. Keep up to date on all the latest from us around Sibos right here on the blog.

     

    The post The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Malaysia appeared first on Accenture Banking Blog.

    Accenture Banking Blog

     
  • user 3:35 pm on September 30, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , fintech, , , ,   

    The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Singapore 

    Following the rollout of regulations in the UK and the launch this year of the EU’s Payment Services Directive 2 (PSD2), countries across the Asia-Pacific region are following suit to establish their own frameworks to enable to share select customer data with third-party providers (TPPs), and TPPs to run transactions on customer accounts.

    Click/tap image to view larger

    Regulatory developments

    ’s approach has matured rapidly to make the city one of the leading jurisdictions for Open Banking in the region. The groundwork was done as early as 2014, under the government’s Smart Nation Singapore initiative to drive the adoption of new digital technologies, starting with open data and payments.

    In November 2016 the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS), in collaboration with the Association of Banks in Singapore (ABS), published a comprehensive roadmap—Finance-as-a-Service: API Playbook—which, in effect, set the gold standard for regulatory advice on the topic in Asia. The playbook set out a comprehensive framework that introduced governance, implementation, use cases and design principles for application programming interfaces (APIs), together with a list of over 400 recommended APIs and over 5,600 processes for their development.

    Click/tap image to view larger

    In May 2017 MAS, the International Finance Corporation and the ASEAN Bankers Association launched the ASEAN Innovation Network. AFIN aims to accelerate financial sector development, boost access to finance, improve the customisability of products and reduce banking costs in the region. AFIN is scheduled to launch their Industry Sandbox, which will sit between banks and fintechs, in late 2018. This interoperable and scalable infrastructure will act as a method to standardise banking infrastructure and data while also allowing institutions to test applications.

    The launch in September 2017 of the Network for Electronic Transfers (NETS) nationwide payments service, including the NETSPay eWallet, was another major milestone. Also in late 2017, the government built an API Exchange (APEX) to serve as a centralised data-sharing platform, which allows government agencies across the city to share data securely through APIs. It has also established a Financial Industry API Register, updated semi-annually, which tracks APIs by functional category as they are launched.

    The approach of Singapore’s authorities to Open Banking has been characterised by a willingness to shape innovation with a comprehensive, non-mandatory regulation and governance framework; to lead by example by opening their own data for APIs, and to establish scalable data practices and a payments infrastructure that underpin innovation in the area. MAS officials have preferred not to force the issue and to approach the development of Open Banking services in an organic fashion, according to comments made in recent media interviews. There is no specific timeline mandated for compliance or adoption.

    Key initiatives, opportunities & risks

    The reason for the regulatory light touch is principally because banks in Singapore see the opportunities of the and are already keenly pursuing them, with competition driving innovation.

    DBS, for instance, launched an Innovation Plan in mid-2015 that had over 1,000 experiments in APIs, cloud computing, microservice architecture and Machine Learning. In May 2016, OCBC Bank launched the first open API developer platform in Asia, Connect2OCBC. CitiBank’s Global Developer Hub opened its first platform in Singapore in late 2016; Standard Chartered did so in early 2017, and DBS in November that year launched an API platform with more than 20 categories and 155 functions. More recently UOB announced plans to launch an open, digital-only bank.

    So far these efforts have been characterised by a focus on retail opportunities, with competition driving banks to move quickly and establish large API platforms while also releasing novel products that showcase Open Banking capabilities.

    Many banks in Singapore, unlike elsewhere in the region, have partnered with fintechs and developers to launch applications that use their publicly available APIs. One example is Standard Chartered’s The Good Life service, which provides its Singapore customers with an ecosystem of merchants that offer deals, alternative payment methods and reward-point options. UOB, by contrast, has been more selective: instead of launching a public developer platform, it has selected specific fintechs and launched applications that leverage their APIs.

    Banks in Singapore have monetised their APIs through a combination of private partnerships with third-party platforms, predetermined pricing models (including subscriptions, per-call and flat-rate charges) and also pricing models determined by sales functions.

    There are risks in Singapore’s approach: Without enforced compliance, API standardisation across the country is difficult. There is also uncertainty around when the MAS will impose regulation.

    Nevertheless, further opportunities will present themselves to drive retail and SME customer adoption with additional services and reduce the cost of servicing banks’ customer bases. Ecosystem platforms for real-time data sharing between banks and regulators will enable new use cases and shared revenue models—and, ultimately, enable banks to build their own TPP services using their competitors’ APIs.

     

    Accenture at Sibos

    We’ll be discussing Open Banking and other topics at Sibos. Come see us at our booth and join us in the conversation around enabling the digital economy. Keep up to date on all the latest from us around Sibos right here on the blog.

     

    The post The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Singapore appeared first on Accenture Banking Blog.

    Accenture Banking Blog

     
  • user 12:19 pm on September 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , fintech, , ,   

    SnapCheck Named Best Payments API by API:World 

    Digital check solution , a graduate of INV , this site&;s sister accelerator, was API (application programming interface) by API:World, the largest global API conference. SnapCheck will receive the award during a special ceremony at the San Jose Convention Center tonight, Sept. 10. SnapCheck allows companies to transition from checks to realtime secure digital [&;]
    Bank Innovation

     
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