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  • @fintechna 9:52 am on November 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , banks, Caution, , , Proceed, , ,   

    Economic Volatility Ahead, Proceed With Caution, Forrester Warns Banks 

    urges to be cautious of , but then charts some aggressive steps they need to take
    Financial Technology

     
  • @fintechna 9:52 pm on November 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , banks, , , , , ,   

    Kony In Deal With Umpqua Bank For Digital Engagement App 

    has expanded its range of banking apps that can sit on top of legacy systems to provide modern functionality. With an acquisition of tech from it can provides with a way to combine digital mobile with human interaction.
    Financial Technology

     
  • @fintechna 8:52 am on October 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: banks, , , , Okay, , , ,   

    Users Think Banks Are Okay At Digital Engagement, But Lag Tech Leaders 

    efforts are decent, but not exciting, to their customers who prefer interacting with Amazon and social media.
    Financial Technology

     
  • @fintechna 12:52 am on October 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , banks, CatchUp, , , , , , ,   

    Payments Are Moving To Real-Time Around The World, The U.S. Plays Catch-Up 

    The move toward real-time in the U.S. has been slow because regulators have not mandated that go real-time.
    Financial Technology

     
  • @fintechna 3:36 pm on October 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , banks, , , , , ,   

    The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Malaysia 

    Following the rollout of regulations in the UK and the launch this year of the EU’s Payment Services Directive 2 (PSD2), countries across the Asia-Pacific region are following suit to establish their own frameworks to enable to share select customer data with third-party providers (TPPs), and TPPs to run transactions on customer accounts.

    The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Malaysia fintech
    Click/tap to view larger

    Regulatory Developments

    As in Singapore, ’s approach to Open Banking, while less comprehensive than that of its city-state neighbour, has been to establish a non-mandatory framework and to support banking transformation with the creation of implementation teams. There are currently no timelines for implementation.

    Malaysia’s central bank and principal financial services regulator, Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM), established a Financial Technology Enabler Group (FTEG) in June 2016 to support innovations in the sector. The FTEG is responsible for formulating and enhancing regulatory policies related to the adoption of new in financial services in the country. Accordingly, in mid-2017 it launched a Regulatory Sandbox framework to allow the testing of applicable technology, including Open Banking.

    In its final quarterly bulletin of 2017 [PDF], BNM focused on open APIs and their potential impact on the country’s financial sector, promising to establish an Open API Implementation Group in early 2018. This was set up in March, with a remit to develop standards on open data, security, access rights and oversight arrangements for TPPs, and to review existing regulations covering controls on customer information.

    Also in March, the BNM set up an Interoperable Credit Transfer Framework (ICTF), which promotes collaborative competition for mobile payments.

    Key market initiatives, opportunities & risks

    The government is prioritising the impact of new technology on the banking sector, with insurers and government agencies a secondary focus. Banks have already seen the opportunities and risks, with some acting to anticipate and benefit from the impact of the country’s vibrant fintech scene, although in the main they lack the capabilities to launch and scale open APIs.

    CIMB, for instance, launched its fintech incubation programme as early as 2015, targeting and mentoring startups for their API platforms. The bank subsequently released a point-of-sale and payments platform. Standard Chartered in early 2017 launched a global developer sandbox with limited API capabilities. Later that year, Maybank also launched a developer portal equipped with 20 APIs, enabling 85 differing operations. Hong Leong Bank, meanwhile, runs a “LaunchPad” contest to develop innovations, which led to the successful launch of five applications in its first year.

    Another significant development that banks in Malaysia seized on was BNM’s granting in December 2017 of an e-money license to WeChat Pay, the payments platform run by Chinese tech giant Tencent. Hong Leong Bank, Maybank, Public Bank and CIMB subsequently partnered with WeChat Pay.

    Partnering with fintech innovators is one way banks in Malaysia are monetising Open Banking APIs; bank-specific POS systems have also been sold with payment-API connectivity. Predetermined pricing models—subscriptions, per-call and flat rate charges—have also been used. So far, successful open API use cases such as Maybank’s Treats Card app, on the Maybank2u platform, have been focused on retail customers.

    The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Malaysia fintech
    Click/tap to view larger

    Several global, regional and Malaysian banks have granted developers access to their APIs via publicly available developer portals and sandboxes. Maybank, OCBC and DBS have advertised various applications and partnerships that have arisen from the use of their developer platforms. Some other banks, such as CIMB and Hong Leong, have been more selective, privately choosing which fintechs can access their APIs.

    The use of developer portals and individual selection means that Malaysia has a number of siloed Open Banking use cases and products. The country’s Open Banking future will depend on how banks, fintechs and regulators develop a common framework and infrastructure that supports a cohesive ecosystem. The ASEAN Financial Innovation Network (AFIN), has been established to do exactly that.

    AFIN, which is supported by the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) and the International Finance Corporation, aims to accelerate fintech innovation, digital transformation and build an Open Banking ecosystem across the region. This gives Malaysian fintechs and banks the opportunity to develop the infrastructure and capabilities with other geographies to support a regional Open Banking ecosystem.

    Like Singapore, there are risks in Malaysia’s approach: without enforced compliance, the standardisation and adoption of APIs across the country could prove difficult. There is also uncertainty around when the Malaysian authorities will impose regulation.

    In Malaysia as well, further opportunities will present themselves to drive retail and SME customer adoption with additional services and reduce the cost of servicing banks’ customer bases. Ecosystem platforms for real-time data sharing between banks and regulators will enable new use cases and shared revenue models—and, ultimately, enable banks to build their own TPP services using their competitors’ APIs.

    This article was written in collaboration with Ewa Wojcik, Sam Waldman and Hakan Eroglu. Many thanks for their input, research and analysis.

     

    Accenture at Sibos

    We’ll be discussing Open Banking and other topics at Sibos. Come see us at our booth and join us in the conversation around enabling the digital economy. Keep up to date on all the latest from us around Sibos right here on the blog.

     

    The post The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Malaysia appeared first on Accenture Banking Blog.

    Accenture Banking Blog

     
  • @fintechna 3:36 pm on October 6, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , banks, , , , , ,   

    The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Malaysia 

    Following the rollout of regulations in the UK and the launch this year of the EU’s Payment Services Directive 2 (PSD2), countries across the Asia-Pacific region are following suit to establish their own frameworks to enable to share select customer data with third-party providers (TPPs), and TPPs to run transactions on customer accounts.

    The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Malaysia fintech
    Click/tap to view larger

    Regulatory Developments

    As in Singapore, ’s approach to Open Banking, while less comprehensive than that of its city-state neighbour, has been to establish a non-mandatory framework and to support banking transformation with the creation of implementation teams. There are currently no timelines for implementation.

    Malaysia’s central bank and principal financial services regulator, Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM), established a Financial Technology Enabler Group (FTEG) in June 2016 to support innovations in the sector. The FTEG is responsible for formulating and enhancing regulatory policies related to the adoption of new in financial services in the country. Accordingly, in mid-2017 it launched a Regulatory Sandbox framework to allow the testing of applicable technology, including Open Banking.

    In its final quarterly bulletin of 2017 [PDF], BNM focused on open APIs and their potential impact on the country’s financial sector, promising to establish an Open API Implementation Group in early 2018. This was set up in March, with a remit to develop standards on open data, security, access rights and oversight arrangements for TPPs, and to review existing regulations covering controls on customer information.

    Also in March, the BNM set up an Interoperable Credit Transfer Framework (ICTF), which promotes collaborative competition for mobile payments.

    Key market initiatives, opportunities & risks

    The government is prioritising the impact of new technology on the banking sector, with insurers and government agencies a secondary focus. Banks have already seen the opportunities and risks, with some acting to anticipate and benefit from the impact of the country’s vibrant fintech scene, although in the main they lack the capabilities to launch and scale open APIs.

    CIMB, for instance, launched its fintech incubation programme as early as 2015, targeting and mentoring startups for their API platforms. The bank subsequently released a point-of-sale and payments platform. Standard Chartered in early 2017 launched a global developer sandbox with limited API capabilities. Later that year, Maybank also launched a developer portal equipped with 20 APIs, enabling 85 differing operations. Hong Leong Bank, meanwhile, runs a “LaunchPad” contest to develop innovations, which led to the successful launch of five applications in its first year.

    Another significant development that banks in Malaysia seized on was BNM’s granting in December 2017 of an e-money license to WeChat Pay, the payments platform run by Chinese tech giant Tencent. Hong Leong Bank, Maybank, Public Bank and CIMB subsequently partnered with WeChat Pay.

    Partnering with fintech innovators is one way banks in Malaysia are monetising Open Banking APIs; bank-specific POS systems have also been sold with payment-API connectivity. Predetermined pricing models—subscriptions, per-call and flat rate charges—have also been used. So far, successful open API use cases such as Maybank’s Treats Card app, on the Maybank2u platform, have been focused on retail customers.

    The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Malaysia fintech
    Click/tap to view larger

    Several global, regional and Malaysian banks have granted developers access to their APIs via publicly available developer portals and sandboxes. Maybank, OCBC and DBS have advertised various applications and partnerships that have arisen from the use of their developer platforms. Some other banks, such as CIMB and Hong Leong, have been more selective, privately choosing which fintechs can access their APIs.

    The use of developer portals and individual selection means that Malaysia has a number of siloed Open Banking use cases and products. The country’s Open Banking future will depend on how banks, fintechs and regulators develop a common framework and infrastructure that supports a cohesive ecosystem. The ASEAN Financial Innovation Network (AFIN), has been established to do exactly that.

    AFIN, which is supported by the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) and the International Finance Corporation, aims to accelerate fintech innovation, digital transformation and build an Open Banking ecosystem across the region. This gives Malaysian fintechs and banks the opportunity to develop the infrastructure and capabilities with other geographies to support a regional Open Banking ecosystem.

    Like Singapore, there are risks in Malaysia’s approach: without enforced compliance, the standardisation and adoption of APIs across the country could prove difficult. There is also uncertainty around when the Malaysian authorities will impose regulation.

    In Malaysia as well, further opportunities will present themselves to drive retail and SME customer adoption with additional services and reduce the cost of servicing banks’ customer bases. Ecosystem platforms for real-time data sharing between banks and regulators will enable new use cases and shared revenue models—and, ultimately, enable banks to build their own TPP services using their competitors’ APIs.

    This article was written in collaboration with Ewa Wojcik, Sam Waldman and Hakan Eroglu. Many thanks for their input, research and analysis.

     

    Accenture at Sibos

    We’ll be discussing Open Banking and other topics at Sibos. Come see us at our booth and join us in the conversation around enabling the digital economy. Keep up to date on all the latest from us around Sibos right here on the blog.

     

    The post The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Malaysia appeared first on Accenture Banking Blog.

    Accenture Banking Blog

     
  • @fintechna 3:35 am on October 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , banks, , , , , ,   

    The need for change in trade finance 

    The role of the bank in the industry has historically been to satisfy four main areas:

    1. facilitation of secure payment execution
    2. provision of finance
    3. management of data and information
    4. mitigation of risk

    In today’s market all these services are available through non-bank service providers, posing a threat to the trade finance establishment.

    The over-reliance on paper and manual checks means that the current processing of transactions is fraught with inefficiencies and risk, which ultimately leads to higher costs. often seek to protect their margins in traditional trade finance by passing these costs on to the corporate client, driving such clients towards open account trade that is riskier but cheaper.

    This is a unique moment in our industry, when changing regulation, increased availability of emerging and changing expectations from corporate clients are pushing banks to their business models beyond the simple digitization of current processes.

    In a sector particularly vulnerable to fraud, letters of credit, standby-letters-of-credit and other trade finance instruments are used to ensure exporters are paid on time by importers. Meanwhile, banks guarantee that importers receive goods that match the terms of the letter of credit. Bank-intermediated trade provides confidence and fosters trade around the world while providing banks with a low-risk source of revenue that is capital efficient under Basel III.

    However, this business is undergoing deep changes:

    • Globalization of the economy has increased knowledge of international trade, helping corporates to better understand cultural and local market requirements in emerging markets. The ability of corporate clients to be self-sufficient in mitigating some of their transaction risk has fueled the shift to open account financing. Although this type of financing does not guarantee payment in the same way a letter of credit does, it is faster, cheaper and relatively frictionless in comparison to a LOC. The emergence of multiple solutions for clients is now calling for a client-centric approach.
    • Digitalization tends to change corporates’ expectations. Corporate treasurers are younger than ever before, and their experiences in shopping and conducting other personal business lead them to expect the same kind of experience in their professional endeavors. They are increasingly looking for an end-to-end digital experience, encompassing communication and documents, advanced reporting and tailored product and service offers. In parallel to client experience, digitalization is a great way to improve employee experience and strengthen the bank’s compliance and risk monitoring.
    • Particularly in emerging markets, there is a shortage of financing available for small to medium enterprises (SMEs); this is due to the retreat by global banks from these countries and a lack of liquidity and correspondent banking relationships for local banks. Over 60 percent of SMEs in emerging markets are rejected for financing and nearly 30 percent do not reapply according to the ICC. In the volatile and rapidly changing world of trade policy the to build shorter, more agile supply chains is even more pressing and the creation/participation in “marketplaces” becoming a real opportunity, in particular for SMEs.

    Out of this mix of social, technological and regulatory change, next-generation trade platforms and processes are emerging. Distributed business models, which no longer rely on banks being central to the financial supply chain, mean that those institutions are looking at ways to retain their relevance to corporate clients. Traditional competitors are collaborating through consortia of ecosystem players, working for the benefit of the entire industry instead of being self-serving in their approach.

    In the second part of this series, we will look at how and other technologies are helping banks rethink and redesign their approach to trade finance.

    Join me at Sibos 2018, as I moderate the “Delivering the trade environment of the future” roundtable. Register here.

    The post The need for change in trade finance appeared first on Accenture Banking Blog.

    Accenture Banking Blog

     
  • @fintechna 3:35 pm on September 30, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , banks, , , , , ,   

    The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Singapore 

    Following the rollout of regulations in the UK and the launch this year of the EU’s Payment Services Directive 2 (PSD2), countries across the Asia-Pacific region are following suit to establish their own frameworks to enable to share select customer data with third-party providers (TPPs), and TPPs to run transactions on customer accounts.

    The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Singapore fintech
    Click/tap image to view larger

    Regulatory developments

    ’s approach has matured rapidly to make the city one of the leading jurisdictions for Open Banking in the region. The groundwork was done as early as 2014, under the government’s Smart Nation Singapore initiative to drive the adoption of new digital technologies, starting with open data and payments.

    In November 2016 the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS), in collaboration with the Association of Banks in Singapore (ABS), published a comprehensive roadmap—Finance-as-a-Service: API Playbook—which, in effect, set the gold standard for regulatory advice on the topic in Asia. The playbook set out a comprehensive framework that introduced governance, implementation, use cases and design principles for application programming interfaces (APIs), together with a list of over 400 recommended APIs and over 5,600 processes for their development.

    The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Singapore fintech
    Click/tap image to view larger

    In May 2017 MAS, the International Finance Corporation and the ASEAN Bankers Association launched the ASEAN Innovation Network. AFIN aims to accelerate financial sector development, boost access to finance, improve the customisability of products and reduce banking costs in the region. AFIN is scheduled to launch their Industry Sandbox, which will sit between banks and fintechs, in late 2018. This interoperable and scalable infrastructure will act as a method to standardise banking infrastructure and data while also allowing institutions to test applications.

    The launch in September 2017 of the Network for Electronic Transfers (NETS) nationwide payments service, including the NETSPay eWallet, was another major milestone. Also in late 2017, the government built an API Exchange (APEX) to serve as a centralised data-sharing platform, which allows government agencies across the city to share data securely through APIs. It has also established a Financial Industry API Register, updated semi-annually, which tracks APIs by functional category as they are launched.

    The approach of Singapore’s authorities to Open Banking has been characterised by a willingness to shape innovation with a comprehensive, non-mandatory regulation and governance framework; to lead by example by opening their own data for APIs, and to establish scalable data practices and a payments infrastructure that underpin innovation in the area. MAS officials have preferred not to force the issue and to approach the development of Open Banking services in an organic fashion, according to comments made in recent media interviews. There is no specific timeline mandated for compliance or adoption.

    Key initiatives, opportunities & risks

    The reason for the regulatory light touch is principally because banks in Singapore see the opportunities of the and are already keenly pursuing them, with competition driving innovation.

    DBS, for instance, launched an Innovation Plan in mid-2015 that had over 1,000 experiments in APIs, cloud computing, microservice architecture and Machine Learning. In May 2016, OCBC Bank launched the first open API developer platform in Asia, Connect2OCBC. CitiBank’s Global Developer Hub opened its first platform in Singapore in late 2016; Standard Chartered did so in early 2017, and DBS in November that year launched an API platform with more than 20 categories and 155 functions. More recently UOB announced plans to launch an open, digital-only bank.

    So far these efforts have been characterised by a focus on retail opportunities, with competition driving banks to move quickly and establish large API platforms while also releasing novel products that showcase Open Banking capabilities.

    Many banks in Singapore, unlike elsewhere in the region, have partnered with fintechs and developers to launch applications that use their publicly available APIs. One example is Standard Chartered’s The Good Life service, which provides its Singapore customers with an ecosystem of merchants that offer deals, alternative payment methods and reward-point options. UOB, by contrast, has been more selective: instead of launching a public developer platform, it has selected specific fintechs and launched applications that leverage their APIs.

    Banks in Singapore have monetised their APIs through a combination of private partnerships with third-party platforms, predetermined pricing models (including subscriptions, per-call and flat-rate charges) and also pricing models determined by sales functions.

    There are risks in Singapore’s approach: Without enforced compliance, API standardisation across the country is difficult. There is also uncertainty around when the MAS will impose regulation.

    Nevertheless, further opportunities will present themselves to drive retail and SME customer adoption with additional services and reduce the cost of servicing banks’ customer bases. Ecosystem platforms for real-time data sharing between banks and regulators will enable new use cases and shared revenue models—and, ultimately, enable banks to build their own TPP services using their competitors’ APIs.

     

    Accenture at Sibos

    We’ll be discussing Open Banking and other topics at Sibos. Come see us at our booth and join us in the conversation around enabling the digital economy. Keep up to date on all the latest from us around Sibos right here on the blog.

     

    The post The brave new world of Open Banking in APAC: Singapore appeared first on Accenture Banking Blog.

    Accenture Banking Blog

     
  • @fintechna 3:35 am on September 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , banks, , frontiers, , , ,   

    New private banking frontiers: mobile apps, convenience & personalization 

    In the first blog in this series, we discussed how seeking to expand their presence in and wealth management should employ digital solutions to provide customers with the and they have come to expect from other companies with which they do business.

    are an essential part of such an integrated private banking strategy. Rather than an “add-on” feature, they should be a central element in providing exclusive services to people with premium needs. These services can range from personalized financial advice (delivered at the frequency the customer desires) to digital feeds of financial media tailored to customer needs.

    A first-class mobile app should be:

    Secure & private

    The app should have two-step authentication and may incorporate a biometric login such as voice, facial or thumbprint recognition, as well as data encryption and fraud protection.

    Innovative

    The app may connect the customer with the private bank via a chatbot or may enable voice-controlled, hands-free interaction. It may aggregate all the customer’s accounts with that institution or with other institutions.

    Robust

    It should provide the customer with a portfolio overview and interactive tools for portfolio analysis and personalization, using both human and -advisory capabilities. The app should support trading, brokerage and foreign exchange transactions as well.
    New private banking frontiers: mobile apps, convenience & personalization fintech

    Interactive

    Through the app, the customer should be able to interact with client services via live chat, through call-backs or through other apps such as WeChat or Whatsapp. The app should also enable direct contact with the financial advisor via direct messaging, direct dial or video conferencing.

    Personalized

    The app should notify the customer of product and service offerings, provide tailored market and economic research and offer educational content using interactive tools and gamification.

    Of course, the question now is not whether private banks should have a mobile app—but how to develop an attractive, value-added offering. Human interaction is still essential to private banking, but wealth managers using mobile apps in concert with other digital technologies will have more time and better insights with which to cultivate their customers.

     

    The post New private banking frontiers: mobile apps, convenience &038; personalization appeared first on Accenture Banking Blog.

    Accenture Banking Blog

     
  • @fintechna 3:35 pm on September 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , banks, ,   

    The art of Open Banking regulation 

    Taking Europe as a blueprint, other jurisdictions are now using as an accelerator to meet their own specific goals, which include increasing competition, reducing costs, fostering innovation and addressing consumer rights.

    Some of the most prominent regulations globally include:

    • PSD2 in the European Union
    • CMA Open Banking in the UK
    • HKMA Open API in Hong Kong
    • Australia Treasury Open Banking
    • Other countries in Asia Pacific (e.g. Japan, Malaysia), North America (e.g. US, Canada) and Latin America (e.g. Brazil, Mexico) are currently investigating Open Banking regulations.

    In some cases, the regulations are moderate and favor the banking industry, while others more aggressively favor competition, which could potentially threaten ’ existing business models and revenues.

    To some degree this depends on which of the multiple levers regulators use to achieve their specific goals, including:

    • Target group: Are all banks regulated or a selected set of banks?
    • Product scope: What banking products are targeted? The more products are affected, the more banks will have to find strategies to defend their existing business or take a leader position by innovating themselves.
    • Use cases and access types: What type of use cases and access operations can be performed on the regulated products? Banks could lose their role as the trusted gatekeeper for customers, particularly where regulations require banks to open their networks to allow third parties to initiate transactions.
    • Cost of usage: What are the costs for third-party providers to use the APIs? Most regulations require banks to open up access for free: in such cases, banks need to find ways to monetize Open Banking.
    • Level of openness: Who has access to the APIs? In some cases, regulations allow TPPs to register with the authorities once and gain access to banks’ APIs without any contractual agreements or bank-specific registration processes.
    • Level of market involvement: Who is involved in designing the ? Are banks’ concerns and ambitions taken into account?
    • API standards and infrastructure: Who is designing API and security standards and building the central infrastructure for the market? This is vital: multiple standardization initiatives could lead to fragmentation of standards and directory services.

    How should banks act now?

    As Open Banking rolls out worldwide, regulators are watching developments closely to learn best practices and implement a regime that will best meet their goals. However, too much regulation could threaten banks’ revenues and jeopardize their financial stability—which is not in regulators’ interests.

    The art of Open Banking regulation is in finding the right balance between regulation and market dynamics. Banks in both regulated and unregulated markets should join forces now to take the lead in self-regulating rather being forced to act.

    Read my complete article at Finextra for more insights and share your views.

     

    Accenture at Sibos

    We’ll be discussing Open Banking and other topics at Sibos. Come see us at our booth and join us in the conversation around enabling the digital economy. Keep up to date on all the latest from us around Sibos right here on the blog.

     

    The post The art of Open Banking regulation appeared first on Accenture Banking Blog.

    Accenture Banking Blog

     
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